Sauna or Steam Room? That Is the Question

Both Sauna and Steam Rooms have a number of benefits that are good for one’s health, but rather than focusing on which one is better one should focus on their own needs. In short, the individual will have to make up their own mind, after all, only they know themselves.

Saunas

The heat in a sauna causes the heart to beat faster, and the blood vessels will widen. This improves circulation, as blood can now move freely around the body without any resistance. This can also help with muscle soreness and improving arthritis conditions.

Studies provide evidence that men who use saunas are less likely to die from cardiovascular diseases or cardiac deaths.

Spending time in a sauna can help one lose calories, twenty minutes being the marker for weight loss of 500 calories. When in a sauna the body’s metabolism speeds up similarly to when actual exercise is done. If exercise isn’t a part of the daily routine, all the elements absorbed in the skin on a daily basis like lead, arsenic, and cadmium are still there deep inside the skin. By sweating in saunas, the human body flushes out all those toxins. The last and final benefit one could guess from saunas is that it relieves stress, because just like when you exercise, releases endorphins into your brain, endorphin reduces pain but in massive quantities is known to also reduce stress and anxiety.

Steam Rooms

Similar to saunas, having bath with steam can improve circulation, lower blood pressure, reduce stress, and burn calories, though unlike saunas, staying inside steam rooms for more than fifteen minutes isn’t advised, as they lose water weight. Steam Rooms create an environment that warms the mucous membrane and encourages deep breathing. This breaks or clears up congestion inside the sinuses and lungs. Studies have shown that children with respiratory infections recovered faster when they used steam bath than those who didn’t use them. (Don’t use when feverish). Everyone knows that steam is good for the skin, but inside the room, the steam opens up the pores and rinses away any dirt and dead skin that typically result in breakouts. Continued use can result in clear and even-toned skin. Exposure to steam can also stimulate cells that fight off infection, making the individual more immune to illness.

Steam Rooms like saunas can help with sore muscles but more specifically it loosens stiff joints and can be used as a cheat warm-up for activities such as yoga, pilates, or running. Studies have also shown that steaming before exercise made the knee joints more flexible.

In Conclusion

Both Steam and Sauna Rooms are said to be dehydrating, they can help with exercise before or after but it should not be used as a substitute for exercise. Saunas can result in dry mouth, while it’s unhealthy to sit fifteen minutes or longer inside steam rooms, they are also more likely to host germs if cleaning is neglected. Nowadays germs are something, everyone, worries about, so getting an indoor steam/sauna room or DIY sauna kit is understandable. Saunas use dry heat, while Steam Rooms use steam from steam generators. So, in short, Saunas are for relaxation, heart and sore muscles or arthritis, meanwhile, Steam Rooms are for those with sinus/lung congestion or for those with skin issues. Always make sure to hydrate after using either one.

Changes In The MBLEx Exam Certification Content Weight

As of July 1st, 2014 The Federation of State Massage Therapy Boards (FSMTB) has put more emphasis on the MBLEx exam focusing on Professional Ethics and Guidelines, Anatomy & Physiology, followed by Assessment and Application. There’s been slight changes in increases and decreases in the make up and breakdown of the MBLEx content weight. The percentages and questions are as follows:

MBLEx Exam Content:
16 to 18 questions on Client Assessment, Reassessment and Treatment plans. This will consist of 17% of the exam.
13 to16 questions on Benefits and Physiological Effects of Techniques. This will consists of 14% of the exam
12 to 15 questions on Pathology with Contraindications, areas of Caution and Special Population. This will consist of 13% of the exam.
4 to 6 questions on Massage and Bodyworks Modalities/Culture and History. This will consist of 5% of the exam.
14 to 17 questions on Ethics, Boundaries, Laws & Regulations. This will consist of 15% of the exam.
12 to 15 questions on Guidelines for Professional Practice. This will consit of 13% of the exam.
10 to 12 questions on Kinesiology. This will consist of 11% of the exam
.1 to 13 questions Anatomy & Physiology. This will consist of 12% of the exam.

While MBLEx content of Anatomy & Physiology, Benefits and Physiological Effects of Techniques that manipulate soft tissue down to about 3%, Ethics, Boundaries, Laws, Regulations, Guidelines for Professional Practice up to about 3%. When preparing to take the MBLEx certification, we highly recommend to prepare and study accordingly.

Having a hundred set of questions, the MBLEx exam has a two hour time limit. Those who prepare for the exam seldom have any problems come exam day. Get a good nights sleep the night before and best rested come exam day. Implementing an online study guide or doing practice exams can be a great beneficial assett as well. If you know before hand what to study it gives you a great advantage on knowing the answer along with the added confidence that really helps. Being prepared always feels good and gives you the best possible chance for the best desired outcome. You want to feel after you’ve answerd the last question that you have passed your certification. Studying before hand using the proper tools will allow you to achieve just that. Last thing you want is to fail your exam and waste all that money you will just have to pay again when retaking it.